WORKING FROM CHARTS

PART 2 OF 4: Colorwork
 

Originally put out in conjunction with the release of Little Things collection, this series breaks down working from charts into 4 separate parts: Knit/Purl patterning, Stranded ColorworkCables, and Lace

We highly recommend you try to familiarize yourself with how charts work. Charts are a great tool, and once you’ve swatched and are more familiar with the pattern, you may find that knitting from a chart is a walk in the park!

 

While most stranded knitting these days is referred to as "Fair Isle" knitting, this is actually a misnomer, as Fair Isle knitting is a very specific type of stranded colorwork originating from the island of Fair Isle. The two stranded colowork designs in the Little Things collection are Norwegian Setesdal-Inspired, so instead of Fair Isle, they are referred to as "stranded colorwork knitting" or "Setesdal colorwork". 

COLORWORK CHART KEY
Typically, all colorwork charts are knit, so the squares in the chart tells you what colors to use for that particular stitch.

Note: This is not the case with Bohus knitting, as the colorwork uses purl stitches to create the patterning, but that is a more advanced technique, so for ease of this tutorial, we are going to focus on the colorwork from Little Things.

Colorwork charts either exclusively have the "blank" squares that identify colors to use, or also include decreases and sometimes even a seemingly strange "no stitch" box. The Kiernan Hat is an example of a pattern with squares, decreases, and  "no stitch" boxes. 

THE "NO STITCH": The No Stitch box is not exclusive to colorwork knitting, as you will see it in all types of charted patterns. Its primary function is to serve as a placeholder - or space-filler - to maintain the arrangement of the stitch boxes in the chart, as well as keep the boxes aligned so that the image the chart creates is maintained correctly.  Regardless of the type of chart-work you are doing, you skip over the box, essentially you do nothing. 

READING COLORWORK CHARTS:
Below is a segment of a colorwork chart with 2 colors, and exclusively knit stitches. Since this chart is worked in ROUNDS, you would work all rounds from right to left as follows:

Round 1: *K4 MC; rep from * around.
Round 2: *K2 MC, k1 CC, k1 MC; rep from * around.
Round 3: *K1 MC, k3 CC; rep from * around.
Round 4: *K2 MC, k1 CC, k1 MC; rep from * around.
Repeat Rounds 1-4 for pattern.
 

Below is a segment of a colorwork chart with 2 colors, as well as decreases and the "no stitch" box. Since this chart is worked in ROUNDS, you would work all rounds from right to left as follows:

Round 1: *K2 MC, k1 CC, k2 MC; rep from * around.
Round 2: *K2tog MC, k3 MC; rep from * around.
Round 3: *K3 MC, k1 CC; rep from * around.
Round 4: *K2tog MC, k2 MC; rep from * around.
Round 5: *K2tog MC, k1 MC; rep from * around.
Round 6: *K2tog MC; rep from * around.

As you can see, instead of doing anything with the no-stitch boxes, they are ignored all together. Again, their primary function is to serve as a placeholder - or space-filler - to maintain the arrangement of the stitch boxes in the chart, as well as keep the boxes aligned so that the image the chart creates (in the case of the chart above, a traditional Lice Stitch) is maintained correctly. 

ADDITIONAL USEFUL TIP:
When teaching stranded knitting, one of the most difficult aspects knitters face (besides knitting too tightly) is keeping track of their chosen colors and the colors in the chart. This is especially true if the dark / light of the MC and CC are switched with the pattern as charted. We implore you to respect the copyright of our - and all - published designs, but you may make a black and white copy of the chart you are knitting from, and using you preferred colored marker or pencil, color in the boxes with the colors you are knitting with. This makes it exponentially easier to keep track of which color you are using and when.

In Part 1: Knit/Purl Patterning, we went over working charts in rows and rounds and working repeats versus working across the whole chart. The same principles use when working Knit/Purl Patterning apply to working Stranded Colorwork, so we recommend you reference that post, regardless of which type of chart you are working from!

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