Knightsbridge Collection Feature / GILLAM: TUCK STITCHES

For the next couple of weeks we'll be profiling the designers featured in the Knightsbridge Collection with some insight into their process, tips + tricks about their garment or accessory, fun interviews, and other little tid-bits. We hope you enjoy getting to know the Kelbourne Woolens team and contributing designers. To view the full pattern line, check out the Knightsbridge Collection on Ravelry here

Today Kate will talk about her Knightsbridge design, Gillam, and is providing a tutorial on working the tuck stitches that appear on the sweater front.

tuck stitches title image.jpg

KGO: The Gillam pullover is one of my most favorite sweater designs to date. A classic, fitted pullover with set in sleeves, a flattering neckline, and a textured tuck and cable pattern on the front, I find it to be effortlessly wearable, and - bonus! - it was a really fun knit. I have received a bunch of questions from people asking for a little more clarification on how to work the 3 row tuck, so I thought a photo tutorial would be perfect for my contribution to our Knightsbridge Collection feature!

KELBOURNE WOOLENS TIPS + TRICKS / TUCK STITCH:
The body of Gillam is worked in the round, and then divided at the armholes and the fronts and backs are worked separately. The stitch pattern is 6 rounds, with a cable every 6th round, and the tuck stitch worked every 3rd round. As a result, you will work the tuck stitch on both RS + WS rows after the armhole division. 

TUCK STITCH / RS ROWS (WORKED IN THE ROUND & WORKED FLAT):
Regardless of whether you are working the tuck in the round or flat, the stitch is worked the same on all right side rows:

1. Once you reach the tuck stitch on the chart, locate the purl stitch two rows below the first stitch on your LH needle. After you have worked a few repeats of the pattern, you may notice that the stitch that you are looking for is the stitch that you worked as the tuck on the previous repeat.

2. With the working yarn in front, insert your right-hand needle into the stitch you've identified from back to front in preparation to work a purl stitch. Your needle will be below the left hand needle. Make sure your needle is only through this stitch - do not try to also "catch" the stitch directly above it, or the stitch on the needle.

3. Purl the stitch! There is nothing "different" you need to do in this step - just pretend the stitch 2 rows below is still on the needle and work it accordingly!

4. The final step is where the tuck really happens. By sliding the stitch (and, subsequently, the two below it) off of the left-hand needle, you're effectively "dropping" them. Since you've caught the stitches 2 rows below with the stitch you've worked as a purl, the two dropped stitches are held - or, in other words, you're stopping them at the purl from dropping further. Depending on the stickiness of the fibers (I found Knightsbridge to be a little sticker than the Organik I used for my swatch), you may need to tug the stitches slightly. 

That's it! This is the way you will work the tuck throughout the whole body. As I mentioned above, though, when working back and forth on the front, you will also be working the tuck stitch on the wrong side of the fabric:

TUCK STITCH / WS ROWS (WORKED FLAT):
1. Once you reach the tuck stitch on the chart, locate the knit stitch two rows below the first stitch on your LH needle. After you have worked a few repeats of the pattern, you may notice that the stitch that you are looking for is the stitch that you worked as the tuck on the previous repeat.

2. With the working yarn in back, insert your right-hand needle into the stitch you've identified from front to back in preparation to work a knit stitch. Your needle will be below the left hand needle. Make sure your needle is only through this stitch - do not try to also "catch" the stitch directly above it, or the stitch on the needle.

3. Knit the stitch! There is nothing "different" you need to do in this step - just pretend the stitch 2 rows below is still on the needle and work it accordingly!

4. The final step is where the tuck really happens. By sliding the stitch (and, subsequently, the two below it) off of the left-hand needle, you're effectively "dropping" them. Since you've caught the stitches 2 rows below with the stitch you've worked as a knit, the two dropped stitches are held - or, in other words, you're stopping them at the purl from dropping further. As with working on the RS row, depending on the stickiness of the fibers, you may need to tug the stitches slightly. 

That's it! This is the way you will work the tuck on the WS rows (Row 3 of the chart) on the yoke . Hopefully this tutorial helped clarify the stitch for anyone looking for a little more help on working the stitch pattern. Happy Knitting! - KGO

-------
If you love this post on the Knightsbridge Collection, check out our other features here.
Looking for more tutorials? Visit our Tips + Tricks page here

Knightsbridge Collection Feature / Humphrey

For the next couple of weeks we'll be profiling the designers featured in the Knightsbridge Collection with some insight into their process, tips + tricks about their garment or accessory, fun interviews, and other little tid-bits. We hope you enjoy getting to know the Kelbourne Woolens team and contributing designers. To view the full pattern line, check out the Knightsbridge Collection on Ravelry here

humphrey.jpg

Today we'll be talking with Leah, web manager and youth consultant, about her Knightsbridge design, Humphrey, and her process when designing her "perfect" Knightsbridge sweater. 

LM: For those of you who don't know me, I'm a Pinterest-aholic. From my dream wardrobe, to ideas for dinner that will never look as good as the picture, to inspirational knit stitches, Pinterest has it all. If Pinterest was a human I would ask it to marry me. All throughout school I utilized Pinterest as a place to keep my inspiration images in an organized manner - while simultaneously dreaming about the day I could justify purchasing $600 boots and spend all day working up the perfect braised chicken recipe.

So, when I started to put the Knightsbridge Collection call for submission together, I used Pinterest to gather images for designers to pull from. Here's a little sampling below, but you can see the full board, here. Taking inspiration from vintage fisherman sweaters, menswear, texture and cables, the mood board swiftly turned into my dream closet.

Humphrey was inspired by long sweater coats that have been popping up recently. I loved how effortless the long sweater looked in the inspiration images that I knew that's what I wanted for my design. Below are a couple of images that became my final inspiration for Humphrey, with more on my Pinterest board, here.

I like to use a couple of outlets to look for inspiration: vintage, what's in retail stores, and runway trends. These three criterium all go through the, "would I wear and want this?" test when narrowing down my initial image search. Yes, that floor length sweater is gorgeous, but I'd constantly step on the hem. Plus, by the time it was finally time to divide for the armhole, I would have bound off to make it a blanket - like most knitters, I want to knit something engaging but not monotonous that won't take me a lifetime to complete. 

After hunting for inspiration I looked for stitches that were simple and showcased the texture of the yarn. Finally, I settled on Rose stitch for it's loftiness and overall textured feel with Garter stitch as a contrast for the neckline. Once all of the elements were in place, Humphrey was born, and I couldn't be happier. 

Long, textured, simple, and exactly what I envisioned. 

Happy inspiration hunting!
-Leah 

You can view Humphrey and the other Knightsbridge patterns on our website here or over on Ravlery here. Check out The Fibre Company Knightsbridge here

Fall + Winter Events

It is hard to believe it, but fall is almost here! As I type this, I'm cosied up at my desk in my Fable cardigan and some shearling slippers, and couldn't be happier! 

While we take the summer off from teaching/traveling, our fall + winter schedule is in full swing and we have lots of wonderful classes and events in the months ahead. When more information is available, there will be a link to the shop page where you can find more information or register. See you there!

SEPTEMBER:
• 28th Knit New Haven Colorwork Workshop, New Haven, CT.

OCTOBER:
• 3rd-5th: Sheep in the Shade Retreat, Claytor Lake, VA. To register, click here.
• 12th: Tangled Web Meet + Greet, Philadelphia, PA.

NOVEMBER:
• 6th: Woolworks Baltimore Sweater Workshop, Baltimore, MD
• 8th: The Knot House Intermediate Lace Workshop, Frederick, MD.
• 15th: The Knitting Boutique Pemberton Shawl Workshop, Glen Burnie, MD

We hope to see you there! - Kate

Craftsy BIG Fall Sale!

Wondering what to knit this Fall? Looking to improve your skills? Want to gain more confidence in your lace work? Then take advantage of Craftsy's Big Fall Sale and sign up for our Craftsy class, New Directions in Lace: Hats for a 50% savings! We had such a great time filming this class with Stephanie Japel and the rest of the Craftsy crew, and we hope you enjoy participating in the class as much as we enjoyed creating it! Click on the image below and scroll to the bottom to find New Directions in Lace!

The first hat, the Spiral Lace Hat, is a simple lace pattern which really helps train your eye to see how and where the pattern moves as you knit.

The second hat, the top-down Medallion Crown hat, is a great way to build your chart reading skills and to build upon what you've learned in the first hat. Plus, you'll learn Courtney's favorite top-down cast on!

The third hat, the True Lace Hat, takes you one step further to working lace patterning on every round. This hat also features very beautifully integrated decreases that even them most skilled knitter and designer can learn from and appreciate!

And, plus, by joining the class, you get personalized instruction from us. The Craftsy platform is a great way to pick our brains! If you haven't been able to take a class with us at your LYS, this is a great way to get access to our exclusive Craftsy patterns AND one on one instruction from us.

All three hats use Canopy Worsted, and each takes only one skein. You can find Canopy Worsted through one of our lovely stockists, or purchase a kit when you sign up for our class!

Enjoy! 

Amanda Knitalong / Cabling Without a Cable Needle

As I mentioned in my last post, I am one of the contributors to the Amanda Knitalong on Fringe Association. If you took the time to read Karen's Meet the Panel post,  you may have noticed that I am working the cables of the cardigan without a cable needle. I do this for a few reasons: a) I am notorious for never having notions. I use snippets of whatever yarn I'm working with for stitch markers, I don't think I've met a darning needle I've used more than once, and I own about 10 tape measures but only know where one is at any given moment, and b) I think it is much, much faster. With at least 5 deadlines going at any given moment, faster = better. We usually teach this technique when in classes + workshops on cabling, and it is a big hit. 

There are a few things to keep in mind when cabling without a needle:
• This technique works best with smaller cables: 2, 4, and 6-stitch cables are great, 8 is an "at-your-own-risk" proposition.
• A sharp needle point is helpful, but not necessary.
• The more slippery the yarn + needle combination, the harder the technique will be.

In the images below I'm working my no-cable-needle cables on the herringbone portion of my Amanda cardigan sleeve. Each cable in this section is a 4 stitch all knit cable: 2 stitches are slipped, 2 are knit and then the 2 slipped stitches are knit.

LEFT CROSS CABLES:

1. Slide the first 2 sts off of your LH needle. Hold these stitches to the front of your work.

KW Tips + Tricks: Cabling without a cable needle

2. Slide the next 2 sts off of your LH needle onto your RH needle.

KW Tips + Tricks

3. Slide the 2 loose front-held stitches one at a time onto your LH needle.

KW Tips + Tricks: Cabling without a cable needle

4. Slide the 2 sts one at a time from your RH needle to your LH needle. You now have all 4 stitches of the cable on the LH needles, pre-crossed in the correct cable stitch.

KW Tips + Tricks

5. Knit all 4 stitches. You cable is complete!

RIGHT CROSS CABLES: 

1. Slide the first 2 sts off of your LH needle. Hold these stitches to the back of your work.

2. Slide the next 2 sts off of your LH needle onto your RH needle.

3. Slide the 2 loose back-held stitches one at a time onto your LH needle.

4. Slide the 2 sts one at a time from your RH needle to your LH needle. You now have all 4 stitches of the cable on the LH needles, pre-crossed in the correct cable stitch.

5. Knit all 4 stitches. You cable is complete! - KGO

-------
Like what you see? Looking for more? Visit our Tips + Tricks page here

And the Winner is...

Last week the fall issue of Knitty was released featuring the Connectivity by Mari ChibaConnectivity calls for The Fibre Company Canopy Worsted as well as the Feel Good Yarn Company SilverSpun. Last week we announced a giveaway for a Connectivity gloves kit featuring a skein of Canopy Worsted and SilverSpun

The lucky winner of our Connectivity gloves giveaway is Shanna with her comment:

"Oooh, I think I would pick Obsidian and then the gloves would match anything in my wardrobe."

Congrats Shanna! Send us an email at info {at} kelbournewoolens {dot} com to claim your Connectivity gloves kit and thanks to everyone else who participated in the contest! Don't forget to check out Connectivity in the latest issue of Knitty, here and read more about the pattern from our original blog post, here

amirisu Fall 2014: Crop Top by Lori Versaci

Fall is almost here and to say I'm excited is an understatement. Sweaters, scarves and hats are starting to pop up on my Ravelry feed adding to both my excitement and Ravelry queue. A recent addition to my queue is the Crop Top pattern from friend and fellow designer, Lori Versaci featured in the fall issue of amirisu

Yeah, it's adorable. Featuring Acadia in Driftwood Lori's Crop Top is a great layering piece for the upcoming fall season. Pair it with a belted shirtdress, boots and a fall jacket and you're ready for a classic fall day. 

I've picked out some color options for my very own Crop Top - Blue Heron is definitely the front runner with Wild Onion and Moraine running a close second and third. 

You can find out more information about Lori's Crop Top pattern in the latest issue of amirisu, here or on the Ravelry project page, here. To view more of Lori's designs, head on over to her website, here. For more information on The Fibre Company's Acadia, click here

Happy knitting!
-Leah